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Allan and Chiz : Walk the Talk

Unlike Butch Abad about whom I wrote last week, both Senators Alan Cayetano and Chiz Escudero were known to me during the anti-President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo days.

I had the privilege of working with both of them in the three impeachment complaints that we filed against Arroyo. PNoy, then their colleague at the House of Representatives, was with us. But the acknowledged brains and spokesman for the impeachment team were Escudero and Cayetano, respectively.

Chiz Escudero was minority floor leader when we filed the first impeachment complaint. Unlike Alan whom I knew only in the course of the impeachment, I have known Chiz since high school in UP Integrated School, although I was three years ahead of him. The task of dealing with the dubious Oliver Lozano bogus impeachment complaint fell on his shoulder, this despite that he and Lozano belonged to the same fraternity.

Alan Cayetano was my best yield from the ill-fated impeachment complaint. While the complaint was thrown out by Arroyo loyalist Edcel Lagman on the basis of “a prejudicial question” which was that the first Lozano complaint, bogus as it was, barred the filing of our substantive complaint. My involvement in the impeachment process gave me a true friend in the person of Senator Cayetano. We may not have reached second base in the sui generis process of the impeachment, but Alan was to shine nationally courtesy of his eloquence and his one-liners.

I have nothing but utmost respect for these two honorable Senators. They are without doubt, men of principle, and both have proven that they adhere to the highest ideal of justice and public accountability.

How do I feel now that we hear that Napoles allegedly paid them off? Like the rest of their supporters, I was very disappointed and sad.

There seems to be a substantial difference between the entanglements of the two senators with the PDAF queen. In Cayetano’s case, it was the uncle, whom everyone knows is the political adviser of the senator, who allegedly received but returned a sum of money because they wanted a bigger percentage. In the case of Escudero, it was alleged that Napoles contributed to his campaign kitty. The difference is, if Napoles is to be believed, that Cayetano’s bribery was frustrated allegedly because his camp wanted a bigger percentage of the loot, while Escudero may have benefited from the scam without probably being aware if it.

Nonetheless, their names have been dragged into the scandal. No longer are both of them the epitome of new politics that they were during the challenging anti-PGMA days.

Am I surprised that even the most idealistic politicians have been dragged into the mess?

Not really. The nature of PDAF as an institutional source of corruption has been widely known since Yvonne Chua and Ellen Tordesillas wrote about it as early as the 1990s. This means that all politicians, even the most progressive, benefitted from institutional corruption for as long as they accepted and/or utilized their pork barrel. That is why only Ping Lacson stands on moral high ground since he is the only one (possibly Joker Arroyo, as well) who refused to accept his pork barrel. So the thought that both Cayetano and Escudero benefited from institutional corruption does not come as a surprise, at least to me.

Be that as it may, the fact that they were dragged into this pork scandal is still depressing, I know both gentlemen as true nationalists. They are competent, and winnable. The two, either individually or together, could very well redefine personality based and feudalistic Philippine politics into an issue and solution based multi-sectoral discussion. While party lists Bayan Muna and Akbayan (during their pre-PNoy collaboration for the latter) have been articulating well the need for progressive politics, Alan and Chiz have also been doing this and still win in the game—something that Bayan and Rissa Hontiveros have failed to do.

Is all lost for these two young beacons of hope?

Most certainly not. But the beginning should be utmost transparency from both of them. Alan here has a bit of an advantage since he never received money from Napoles, even if it is for the wrong reason. He should probably use this opportunity to clean his own backyard and get rid of nepotism within his own camp. This should mean retirement for his uncle.

Chiz, on the other hand, should just come clean since the only allegation against him is that he received campaign funds from Napoles. He probably did on his first run for Congress when as a member of the opposition, there was truly a dearth of campaign funds for those who opposed Mrs. Arroyo. But he has to come clean and be honest in this regard.

I also personally know that both senators have been utilizing the same contractor from the South, notorious also for paying SOPs to his legislator principals. Perhaps, as part of their re-birth in Philippine politics, they should both shun this practice of favoring contractors whom Chua and Tordesillas claim will in turn, pay kickbacks to the legislators. This entire scheme explains the sad state of our public infrastructure.

Not all is lost for these two brilliant statesmen. But they have to walk the talk. They have to practice new politics and not just play lip service to it.

What happens now to JPE et al?

Now that the Ombudsman has found probable cause against three senators, Janet Napoles and Dennis Cunanan for plunder and violations of the anti-graft law, what happens next? Will they immediately be put behind bars and tried in the same manner that former President Erap Estrada was?

Not quite.

All indicted accused have the statutory right to move for reconsideration on the finding of probable cause. There is probable cause when on the basis of the evidence, the Prosecutor or the Ombudsman concludes that there is likelihood that a crime was committed and that the respondents are probably liable for these crimes. It’s a very low standard because ultimately, the determination of guilt beyond reasonable doubt is a judicial function. Nonetheless, when the indictment is for a capital offense where bail is not a matter of right when the evidence of the accused is strong, a finding of probable cause is almost always a guarantee of the temporary deprivation of the right to liberty.

So, because of their right to move for reconsideration, no information is immediately forthcoming. Consequently, there will also be no warrant of arrest that will be issued soon.

I was correct in my assessment that the finding itself of probable cause will be marred with delay. The Ombudsman resolution came eight months after newspaper reported the details of the scam. This is still relatively quick given that the Ombudsman, unlike the regular Prosecutors, do not comply with the requirement that they conclude their preliminary investigations on or before 90 days from submission of the case. Clearly, it was the public indignation of the PDAF scam that compelled the Ombudsman to act more quickly than usual.

Outside of the motion for reconsideration, the accused may also proceed to the Court of Appeals to challenge the determination of probable cause. Although this is no longer a statutory right, it is nonetheless a constitutional right since the 1987 Constitution provides that judicial power includes the power to annul acts of government which are done in utter grave abuse of discretion amounting to lack of or in excess of jurisdiction. There is grave abuse of discretion where there is a violation of the Constitution or any existing law. Already, Senator Bong Revilla has a pending petition describing the Ombudsman’s refusal to act on his complaints against Luy et al as acts indicating grave abuse of discretion The Supreme Court has already scheduled his petition for oral arguments.

It is only after the resolution of the motion for reconsideration and if the higher courts do not restrain the Ombudsman that the information is filed with the Sandiganbayan. Unless the information is filed, the special anti-graft court cannot issue warrants of arrest.

Is it for certain that the accused will be apprehended and detained?

Yes, insofar as their actual arrest is the manner by which the Court can acquire jurisdiction over their persons. Fortunately for the respondents, they can now invoke the new rules of the Supreme Court on the speedy grant of bail to secure provisional release even for capital offenses. Under A.M. No. 12-11-2- or the SC “GUIDELINES FOR DECONGESTING HOLDING JAILS BY ENFORCING THE RIGHTS OF ACCUSED PERSONS TO BAIL AND TO SPEEDY TRIAL”, the respondents, when they are charged in court can file a petition for bail. The procedure now is on the basis of affidavits or direct testimonies, the prosecutor has the burden to prove that the evidence of guilt is strong. Thereafter the Judge, including the Sandiganbayan, only has 48 hours to summarize the evidence presented and determine whether or not the evidence of guilt is strong. If so, the accused will be denied bail. Otherwise, he will be allowed to post bail to secure his provisional liberty.

This new guidelines is long delayed. The predisposition of Courts is to allow the prosecution to prove that the evidence of guilt is strong in a manner that would reproduce the evidence presented for bail as evidence on the merits. In this manner, the accused is for all intents and purposes, denied the right to bail because the determination of guilt is made part and parcel of the presentation of the evidence on the merits.

Senator Juan Ponce Enrile as an octogenarian will probably be given special consideration given his age. So will the two incumbent senators. While pickpockets and others committing petty crimes have to endure torturous conditions in our local jails, the three senators, because of precedents—will inevitably detained in special detention facilities. Already, Janet Lim Napoles is on hospital arrest. I foresee that Enrile and the two other senators may also seek hospital or house arrest. Note that being an octogenarian will not exempt Enrile from criminal prosecution or from being arrested. This is how the Sandiganbayan can acquire jurisdiction over his person. But when he is convicted, the Sandiganbayan has the option of recommending his release on humanitarian grounds.

What happens to Ruby Tuason and Cunanan? To begin with, I’m surprised that they were even indicted. Under the Witness Protection Law, those admitted into the program should not be included in the charge sheet. Perhaps the Ombudsman will later move that they be dropped. Otherwise, it could already be an indication that the Ombudsman does not consider their testimonies to be indispensable in proving the averments in the Information. Personally, I hope this is in fact the case. Let Tuason be the queen of socialites in jail.

 

(View from Malcolm, Manila Standard Today, 4 April 2014)

 

 

AMPATUAN VICTIMS TO SEEK REDRESS WITH UN COMMITTEE ON HUMAN RIGHTS. 14 Victims signed authority to negotiate a settlement with Ampatuans

On the occasion of the 43rd month commemoration of the Ampatuan massacre, Prof. Harry Roque, Chairman of the Center for International Law and Private Prosecutor of 17 media victims of the massacre, announced that their clients will resort to a filing of a communication with the United Nations Human Rights Committee for the Philippine government’s failure to accord the victims their rights to an adequate remedy under domestic law and compensation.

In at least 2 Views made by the UN Human Rights Committee where the Philippines was found guilty of breaching its obligation to protect and promote the right to life (the Pestano and Marcellana cases) for its failure to seasonable investigate and prosecute the killings of Navy Ensign Philip Pestano and Eden Marcellana, the Committee already declared that the Philippine government owes victims of extralegal killings these two obligations. “Thus far, it’s been almost 4 years and there is still no end in sight to the criminal prosecution of the Ampatuans. In fact, the Philippine government took almost 4 years just to file the information for the 58th victim, Reynaldo Momay. This should give us a clue on how long the criminal proceedings will take,” Roque added

Furthermore, Roque explained that the duty to pay compensation to the victims of the massacre is separate and distinct from the civil damages that the Court may order the accused to pay to the private complainants as part of the judgment in the criminal cases for murders. “The compensation that is due to the victims is because it is the state itself that breached its obligation to protect and promote the right of the victims to live. This includes not just monetary compensation, but also all that may be required tor restore the emotional and psychological well being of the victims. “We still have a pending motion for the Court to order government agencies to provide psycho-social support to the victims. This has not been acted upon but has strangely, given rise to a petition filed by the accused to cite us in contempt allegedly for “prejudging” the merits of the case”, Roque declared.

The need of the victims for compensation has been highlighted by the fact that 14 media victims, including 4 represented by Centerlaw, signed a written authority in February of this for a close associate of the Ampatuans to negotiate a settlement with the accused. Under this scheme, the victims were to sign not just a waiver and quitclaim, but also an affidavit pinning the blame for the massacre to Governor Toto Mangundadatu.

“Unless the Philippine government complies with its duty to pay compensation, the victims will continuously be tempted with schemes that may eventually cause a miscarriage of justice”, Roque said.

Roque asked all media groups and all those adhering to the rule of law to support the communication by filing their own interventions and briefs in due course

#30#

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